127 Hours (2010) Review


127 Hours is a 2010 British-American biographical survival drama film co-written, produced and directed by Danny Boyle. The film stars James Franco, Kate Mara, Amber Tamblyn and Clémence Poésy.
In the film, canyoneer Aron Ralston must find a way to escape after he gets trapped by a boulder in an isolated slot canyon in Bluejohn Canyon, southeastern Utah, in April 2003. It is a British and American venture produced by Pathé, Everest Entertainment, Film4 Productions, HandMade Films and Cloud Eight Films.
The film, based on Ralston's memoir Between a Rock and a Hard Place (2004), was written by Boyle and Simon Beaufoy, co-produced by Christian Colson and John Smithson, and scored by A. R. Rahman. Beaufoy, Colson, and Rahman had all previously worked with Boyle on Slumdog Millionaire (2008).
127 Hours was well received by critics and audiences and was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Actor for Franco and Best Picture.
The film's title refers to the period of non-stop activity from when Ralston awoke on the day of his accident to when he was put under anesthesia during his rescue.

Jobs (2013) Review


Jobs is a 2013 American biographical drama film based on the life of Steve Jobs, from 1974 while a student at Reed College to the introduction of the iPod in 2001. It is directed by Joshua Michael Stern, written by Matt Whiteley, and produced by Stern and Mark Hulme. Steve Jobs is portrayed by Ashton Kutcher, with Josh Gad as Apple Computer's co-founder Steve Wozniak. Jobs was chosen to close the 2013 Sundance Film Festival.
The film opens in 2001 with a middle-aged Steve Jobs (Ashton Kutcher) introducing the iPod at an Apple Town Hall meeting.
The story flashes back to Reed College in 1974. The high tuition forces Jobs to drop out, but Dean Jack Dudman (James Woods) allows him to sit in on classes. Jobs is particularly interested in a calligraphy course.
Jobs meets up with his friend Daniel Kottke (Lukas Haas), who is excited to see Jobs with a copy of Be Here Now by Baba Ram Dass. Influenced by this book and his experiences with LSD, Jobs and Kottke spend time in India.
Two years later, Jobs is back in Los Altos, California, living with his adoptive parents Paul (John Getz) and Clara (Lesley Ann Warren). While working for Atari as a video game developer, Jobs develops a partnership with his friend Steve Wozniak (Josh Gad).
Jobs is encharged by company President Nolan Bushnell to develop an arcade video game (Breakout), which he ends up having Wozniak build in his place. He also inequitably distributes the salary for the game development between Wozniak and himself.

Mr. Beans Holiday (2007) Review


Mr. Bean's Holiday is a 2007 comedy film based on the British television series Mr. Bean, as well as a standalone sequel to 1997's Bean. Directed by Steve Bendelack and written for the screen by Hamish McColl and Robin Driscoll (a writer on the TV series), from a story by Simon McBurney, it is a British-American venture produced by StudioCanal, Working Title Films and Tiger Aspect Films, and distributed by Universal Pictures. The film stars Rowan Atkinson in the title role, with Max Baldry, Emma de Caunes, Willem Dafoe and Karel Roden in supporting roles.
Mr. Bean's Holiday was theatrically released in the United Kingdom on 30 March 2007 and in the United States on 24 August 2007, to mixed reviews from critics but box office success, grossing $229.7 million worldwide against a $25 million budget.
In a raffle, Mr. Bean wins a holiday by train to Cannes, a video camera, and €200. Before catching his train, Bean causes chaos while sampling French seafood cuisine in a Paris restaurant.
On the platform at Gare de Lyon, Bean asks Russian movie director Emil Duchevsky to film him boarding the train using his new video camera. Bean keeps asking for retakes, until the train leaves with Bean and Duchevsky's son Stepan on the train and Duchevsky left behind.
Bean and Stepan get off at the next station. When Duchevsky's train passes through the station without stopping, he holds up a mobile phone number but inadvertently obscures the last two digits. Attempts to call the number are fruitless. They board the next train but Bean has left his wallet, passport, and ticket in the telephone booth and they are thrown off the train.
Bean busks as a mime and buys the pair bus tickets to Cannes. Bean manages to lose both his ticket and Stepan so he sets out walking and hitchhiking.